Blog - Amaral Farm

How Long Does It Take For Beans to Grow?

Beans are an amazing plant to grow. They germinate well, store very well, and are very nutritious.

If you’re like me, then you love to eat beans. They are a great source of protein and fiber. However, if you’ve ever wondered how long does it take for beans to grow? The answer is not as simple as you might think. Beans can be grown in many different ways- some require more time than others. A few varieties can take as little to grow as fifty days to grow, the Bountiful is one such bean. Others like the Hidatsa Red Bean can take up to 100 days. A huge difference! One that you need to take into account when deciding to grow them.

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How Tall Does Mexican Heather Get?

With its delicate-looking flowers and rich foliage, Mexican heather is perhaps the most common Cuphea species grown in U.S. gardens. It’s typically grown as a heat-loving perennial in the south and summer-specific annual in the north because of its tenderness to frost. But with the right care, this beautiful bloom can survive winter climates across the U.S. – you might just need to bring it indoors once the weather turns cool.

How Tall Does Mexican Heather Get?

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How to Grow Heirloom Tomatoes: 10 Tips for Success

Has growing tomatoes always been on your list of aspirational hobbies? Do mouthwatering heirlooms make your heart skip a beat and add a spring to your step? Are you excited to try out your new gardening shovel and sun hat, but need a little bit of reassurance to help make your first dig into the dirt? Then read on for all of the best tips about flourishing a crop of colorful and juicy heirloom tomatoes.

Growing Tomatoes of the Heirloom Variety: 10 Tips for Success

1. Start with Seeds

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How Do You Control Leaf Miner Insects Organically?

Many gardeners have seen the telltale signs of a leaf miner infestation, with thin white trails that run through the leaves of the plants in your garden showing the clear signs of the presence of this common pest. The spread of these creatures can cause long-term damage to the health and productivity of your garden, making them a nuisance that can be difficult to live with.

If you want to stay on top of this problem using organic solutions, we have some recommendations for you to try. We’ll go over how to identify a problem caused by these insects, as well as some remedies and prevention steps you can try out to reduce their presence in your garden and keep your plants growing healthy and happy.

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How Do I Get Rid of Aphids on My Plants?

Aphids are a common problem for organic gardeners. These small pests cause damage to plants by sucking the juice out of them and injecting their own substances into the plant. They can be difficult to spot because they are tiny, but you may notice wilting leaves or yellowing foliage in their wake. If you have aphids in your garden, then it’s about time for some organic gardening pest control.

11 Smart Methods of Organic Gardening Pest Control

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Growing Heirloom Tomatoes in Southern Climates

Harvesting your own fruit and vegetables is one of the most rewarding parts of gardening. Many people opt for tomatoes because they are straightforward to grow, produce a large crop, and are easy to incorporate into a variety of meals. But the excessive heat and risk of blight can make growing heirloom tomatoes challenging in hot, Southern climates. Let’s examine how you can protect your plants and what varieties you might opt for to ensure success.

Growing Heirloom Tomatoes in the South

In general, growing tomatoes is fairly easy, and it should be possible in many different climates. However, hot or humid weather can make the process a bit more difficult. The two biggest problems you’ll face are excessive heat and blight, which is a disease that affects the growth of your plants. If you live in the South of the USA or another area of the world that is very warm in summer, you’ll have to protect your plants from these dangers.

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How to Freeze Green Beans From the Garden

Green beans are a wonderful option to grow in your garden, but if you want to freeze green beans, it’s important to avoid some common issues. In this article, we’re going to walk you through how to do it properly so you can enjoy your home-grown green beans year-round.

How to Freeze Green Beans From the Garden

If you’re wondering if it’s okay to freeze green beans while fresh, we’ve got good news for you. You absolutely can freeze them, and the process isn’t too complicated. They can last months in the freezer, so even when green bean season is over, you can still use your frozen green beans in a variety of stew, stir-fry, and casserole dishes.

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Can I Leave Tulip Bulbs in Pots After Flowering?

Tulips are some of the most colorful, versatile flowers you can have in your garden. These flowers come in dozens of varieties, require little maintenance compared to other plants, and bloom beautifully after you plant them. However, many people wonder if they can plant tulip bulbs in pots and keep them there or if they need to eventually replant tulips in the ground.

If you’re considering planting tulips, you will want to know the ins and outs of these flowers before beginning your planting process. Knowing all about tulips will ensure that your flowers stay healthy throughout the summer and live in the best possible conditions for them to thrive. Read on to learn more about the care and planting of tulips.

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Do You Plant Sunflower Seeds Pointed Up or Down?

Sunflowers are just about the epitome of sunshine and summertime. Bright and sunny, they seem to be smiling as they track the sun with their tall heads. Sunflowers are so easy to grow. Their is so much about Sunflowers to them, from creating privacy in the garden to enticing birds or providing a beautiful bouquet of cut flowers. Anyone can plant sunflower seeds and enjoy the benefits of this wonderful plant. We’ll tell you everything you need to know.

How To Plant Sunflower Seeds

Pointed Down

Sunflower seeds will sprout best if you plant them with the narrow pointed seed-end facing down. While it isn’t strictly necessary to do this, it does give the sunflowers the best possible start in life. And why wouldn’t we want to give them that? They’re going to repay us with beautiful blooms and nutritious seeds after all. The narrow end of the seed is where roots will emerge, so putting this end down saves the plant from having to right itself in the ground.

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What Do You Do With Amaryllis Bulbs After They Bloom?

Amaryllis are large, trumpet-shaped flowers that bring a punch of color to any home or garden. Gardeners typically start with amaryllis bulbs, which look similar to an onion, that then sprout long, thin leaves and the iconic blooms. Amaryllis flowers come in eye-catching colors, can be over twelve inches wide, and can last for over seven weeks! But after that first flower starts to fade, many will ask: what do you do with amaryllis after they bloom?

The Basics of Re-Blooming

Amaryllis thrives in an environment with a nine-month wet period and a three-month dry period. By mimicking this cycle, you can encourage your plant to re-bloom after a forced dry or dormant period. Removing all foliage before the dormant period allows the bulb to retain vital nutrients and energy stores. Most importantly for all plants, provide your amaryllis with all the water and fertilizer it needs while it is growing.

After the Flowers Fade

Once your flowers begin to whither, it is best to cut them off before they start to form seeds. Creating seeds pulls vital nutrients and energy away from the rest of the plant. Keeping your amaryllis bulb healthy and full of available energy is the best way to promote re-flowering.

As the flower stalk dries out and starts to turn brown, cut it down within an inch of the bulb. Green leaves and stems should be left to continue photosynthesis, the process in which plants convert carbon dioxide and water into energy utilizing sunlight. By allowing photosynthesis to continue, your plant will build stores of nutrients and energy needed for the next re-blooming period.

Replanting Your Amaryllis Bulbs

If your amaryllis needs to be replanted, the best time to do so is when it is not in bloom. The plants prefer to be in a small pot with very little extra room (“pot-bound”). The pot should only be approximately one inch wider than the amaryllis bulb, but deep enough for the roots to have space to grow.

Loosely add a well-draining soil below and around your bulb, with one-third of the bulb remaining visible. Ideally, the top of the bulb should be above the edge of your container. Your pot must have drainage holes on the bottom to prevent mold and root rot.

Continuous Blooming

Unlike other bulb species, such as hyacinth and tulip, amaryllis bulbs do not require a chilling or dormant period to bloom. With the right environment and care, your plant can continuously re-bloom after it stores enough nutrients and creates enough energy.

In areas where frost is not an issue, amaryllis can be grown outdoors year-round. Otherwise, they will need to be inside during the cold months and inside or outside during the warm months. Keeping your amaryllis in full sun (or as much sun as possible) will allow it to synthesize the energy needed to bloom again as soon as possible.

Forced Dormancy

If you live in an area with freezing winter temperatures, or would just like to control when your amaryllis blooms, you can force your plant into a dormant period. During the dormant period, your plant remains alive but it is using very little energy and nutrients. By saving energy, the bulb will be ready to grow when the appropriate conditions are met (warm and sunny).

Once your blooms have died and been trimmed off, bring your plant inside to a dark, dry location, like a closet or basement. Ideally, the temperature would be between 50 to 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Let the stems and leaves dry out and die off naturally before trimming down to the bulb. You can also remove the bulb from the soil to save space and allow it to rest as-is during this period.

Do not water or fertilize during dormancy, but check the amaryllis periodically for mold or other issues. After two to three months, you can move your plant to a sunny location and begin watering and fertilizing as normal. This forced dormancy will allow you to try to schedule your blooms around certain times of year or holidays.

The Holiday Amaryllis

The amaryllis has become a holiday staple in many homes, with pre-planted bulbs in decorative pots available for purchase a couple of months before the winter holiday season. If you would like to have your existing plant bloom for the holidays, stop fertilizing the plant in August.

In September, move your amaryllis into its dormant location and stop watering. Cut back the foliage down to the bulb as it starts to dry out. Follow the dormancy procedures until early November, when you can put your bulb back into a warm spot with sunlight and water as normal.

In the Garden

If you live in hardiness zones 8-10 (frost-free), your amaryllis bulbs can be planted outdoors directly in your garden. Garden amaryllis tend to bloom once in spring and will go dormant over winter if it is cool enough. In a warm enough location, it is possible for the plants to re-bloom more times throughout the year.

Like with potted amaryllis, water when needed. Fertilizer is only needed before the plant putting up its flower stalk during the growth period. Trim off leaves and stems as they begin to turn yellow and die off.

Picking Your Amaryllis

Amaryllis has many varieties that differ in flower color and size. You can pick the best one for your needs or preferences. Here are a few of our favorites:

  • “Cherry Nymph” will produce multiple smaller blooms with bright red flowers on two stalks 
  • “Clown” has eight-inch wide blooms of striped red and white petals
  • “Evergreen” is a vibrant, light-green hue that can add a tropical feel to your home
  • “Rilona” has subtle, apricot orange petals, an unusual color for amaryllis
  • “Ferrari” will wow everyone with vibrant red blooms that are over twelve inches wide 
  • “Dancing Queen” a great variety for zones 8-10, a great fit for Florida it has beautiful white & red striped large flower pedals

Once you have your amaryllis bulb and the right pot for it, place the plant in a well-lit area that is between 65 and 75 degrees

Optimal Amaryllis Care

Once you have your amaryllis bulb and the right pot for it, place the plant in a well-lit area that is between 65 and 75 degrees

Outdoors, your amaryllis can handle partial shade to full sun. Once blooms are present, the plant prefers some shade to allow the flowers to stay bright as long as possible. Indoors, it is best to place your bulbs in a sunny window, southern exposure being ideal, during the growth period.

After you first plant your bulb, water sparingly until you see a couple of inches of growth out of the top, then water frequently. The amaryllis bulb will contain everything the plant needs nutrient-wise for the first flowers, but when attempting to get your plant to re-bloom, use a phosphorus-rich fertilizer to rebuild nutrient stores.

For the best flowers, turn your pot every couple of days as the flower stalk is growing. This will keep the stalk growing straight for the tallest blooms. If the bud is too heavy, a support stake can help keep it upright. Once the flower starts to open, keep the plant out of direct sunlight to prolong its life of the flower.

By giving your plant the best opportunity to store nutrients and energy throughout the year, your amaryllis will continue to provide you with beautiful blooms.

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